Print Finishing

Print processing is the process of applying images or text to a variety of printing paper, plastic, metal or other materials. This process is designed to produce high quality printed materials such as books, magazines, posters, flyers, packaging materials, etc.

The history of printing processes goes back hundreds of years, but with the advancement of technology, the printing machines used today have become more sophisticated and efficient. Modern printing machines can use a variety of technologies, including lithography, letterpress, gravure, and digital printing, which can be adapted to different printing needs and materials.

The printing process has a wide range of applications, not only limited to traditional publications and advertising materials. It is also used in the manufacture of trademarks, labels, stickers, decorations, electronic products and other products. Print processing can also be used to produce artwork and personalized gift items.

Although the printing process has become an integral part of modern production, it also poses a number of environmental and health problems. For example, the chemicals released during the printing process can be harmful to workers and the environment. As a result, many printing companies and governments are taking steps to reduce these negative impacts and improve the sustainability of the printing process.

In short, print finishing is an important production technology that provides high quality printed products for a variety of products. As technology continues to evolve, print finishing will continue to play an important role and adapt to changing market demands.

Types of Printing

There are several types of printing processes, each with its own unique advantages and application scenarios. The following are some of the most common types of print finishing:

Offset printing: Offset printing is one of the most common types of printing processes and is also known as offset printing. It uses a flat printing plate and rollers to apply ink to the plate and then transfer it to paper or other materials. It is suitable for mass production and is therefore commonly used in the production of large quantities of printed materials such as books, magazines, and posters. 2.

2. Letterpress printing: Letterpress printing uses raised patterns or text printed on paper or other materials. The plate can be metal or plastic, and its surface is engraved into the desired shape. Toppan printing is suitable for products with simple structures, such as business cards, stickers, labels, etc. 3.

3. Gravure printing: Gravure printing, also known as recessed printing, uses recessed patterns or text printed on paper or other materials. The plate can be metal or plastic, and its surface is engraved into the desired shape. Gravure printing is suitable for making high-quality and high-precision products such as bills, stamps, credit cards, etc. 4.

Digital printing: Digital printing is a type of printing process in which images or text are printed on paper or other materials through computer-controlled printers. Digital printing is suitable for small-batch printing and personalized printing, such as business cards, posters, flyers, etc.

In addition to these common types of printing processes, there are other special types of printing processes, such as screen printing, flexographic printing, and thermal transfer printing. Each type has its own application and advantages. Choosing the right type of printing process can improve the quality and efficiency of printed products.

Types of Post-Printing Processing

Post-press processing refers to the processing of printed materials after printing is completed to enhance their functionality and aesthetics. The following are some common types of post-printing processes:

1. die cut: die cut is the process of cutting large, printed materials into the desired size and shape. For example, a flyer printed on a large sheet of paper is cut to the size and shape of a single page or folded page.

2.folding: Folding is the process of folding printed materials into the desired shape and size. For example, folding a poster printed on a large sheet of paper into a brochure. 3.

3. lamination: laminating is the process of laminating printed pages together to form a book or magazine. Laminating can be done using hot or cold glue. 4.

4. perforation: perforation is the process of punching holes in the print to hang it on a wall or other support. Perforation can be done with a punch or drill machine. 5.

5. coating: Coating is the process of applying a protective coating to the surface of a print to improve its durability and appearance. The coating can be glossy or matte, depending on the needs of the print.

6. hot stamping: Hot stamping is the process of heating a certain amount of metal foil on the surface of a print so that it adheres to the print to create an elevated appearance. Hot stamping can be achieved using pressure and heat.

Debossing / embossing: Debossing / Embossing is the process of printing a texture or pattern on the surface of a print using pressure and heat to enhance its appearance and texture.

8. Spot UV : Spot UV applies a high-gloss UV coating to the product by using ultraviolet (UV) light to cure the varnish of the printed material.

9. Laser Cut: Laser cutting is a process that uses a focused, high-power density laser to cut through a workpiece.

These post-press types can be used individually or in combination to create more complex and versatile printed products.

What is SPOT UV?

Spot UV is a popular coating technique that applies a high-gloss UV coating to a product by using ultraviolet (UV) light to cure the varnish of the printed material. This Spot UV printing method gives the target “spot” a glossy, vibrant appearance and adds a protective coating to the printed product. In addition to being applied to the entire card, the “Spot” element of the “Spot” process is worth mentioning. Spot UV was developed as a method to apply color to the packaging area without covering other locations. This process provides higher print quality than traditional screen printing and does not affect the underlying graphics or typography. Spot UV can be used to draw attention to, for example, a Spot UV placed on a logo so that only the logo area has a shine.

What is LASER CUT?

Laser cutting is a process that uses a focused high-power laser beam to irradiate the workpiece, causing the irradiated material to melt, vaporize, erode, or reach the ignition point rapidly, while blowing away the molten material with a high-velocity air stream coaxial with the beam, thus realizing the cutting of the workpiece. Laser cutting can be divided into four categories: laser vapor cutting, laser melting cutting, laser oxygen cutting, and laser scribing and controlled fracture. Laser cutting can achieve a variety of metal, non-metal sheets (such as paper), composite materials and other cutting, in various fields have a wide range of applications.

The difference between oiling and laminating

Oiling and laminating are two common surface treatment methods in post-printing processing. The difference between them is as follows:

1. OILING

Over-oiling refers to the application of an oily coating other than ink on the surface of the printed material to protect the surface of the printed material and to increase gloss and water resistance. Over-oiling generally uses a colorless and transparent oil-based coating, which can be used for single-color or multi-color printing. The surface of the print will become smooth after overcoating, improving the texture and appearance of the print. Overcoating is suitable for various types of printed materials, such as books, picture books, posters, packaging boxes, etc. 2.

2. LAMINATING

Overglaze is a layer of gelatinous coating applied to the surface of printed materials to protect the surface of the printed materials and increase the luster and abrasion resistance. Over-lamination can be done with single-color or multi-color printing. Overlays are generally colored gum coatings that give the printed surface a rich color and texture. Overlays are suitable for various types of printed materials, such as books, posters, boxes, etc.

In short, both over-oil and over-laminate are used to protect the surface of printed materials and to improve the texture and appearance of printed materials. Over-oil is an oil-based coating, while over-laminate is a gum-based coating, with slightly different coating properties and effects.